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weapons of the nato alliance, like this air strike by britain. and yet, u.s. military officials concede today that the libyan regime is still determined to fight and reinforced its positions in the eastern cities fwh including ajdabiya. the occasion says gadhafi is trying to recruit and arm volunteers to fight rebel forces. the libyan strongman defiant as nato moves to take over command of the libyan mission. the top u.s. commander of the operation tells me that nato has now agreed in principle to not only take charge of the no-fully zone but to also to protect libyan civilians as well. the details will be worked out, he says, over the next few erda. general carter ham sending a message directly to gadhafi. here in "the situation room," we spoke just a littlewhilego and i had this exchange with him. cnn is seen live around the world, including in libya. and officer your military-to-military -- the officers surrounding gadhafi might be watching right now, gadhafi might be watching, his sons might be watching. look into atthe camera. what would you say to them right now, officer t officer
united does admit that united will be shrinking it's domestic u.s. network because, he says, the focus in the future is going to be on international coverage. >> the domestic u.s. is a very difficult place to make money. brutal regulation and overtaxation, so it's very hard to make money domestically and that's why our growth has been international. even this year as we were originally going to grow between 1% and 2% this year and because of high fuel prices, we have brought that back to flat. but even there, that flat is comprised of shrink the domestic systems and growing the international systems. >> this is fascinating because this tells us that the united-continental merger says that airlines in the united states is going to start to look very different. it's got these massive hubs, chicago, washington, houston, newark, los angeles, san francisco, denver. but they're going to be geared to funneling out to the rest of the world. >> so did he say anything about the frequent flyer miles? that's what i want to know. >> tell me about it. he did admit that between them, united and conti
belong to al-qaeda. >>> and u.s. supreme court justice skeela has been ticketed for causing an accident along the george washington parkway. the 75-year-old was on his way to the high court when he rear ended the car in front of him setting off a chain reaction. >>> mayor stephanie rawlings- blake will unveil her budgets today. in it, there's 8% less spending for the year of 2012. some of the cuts include reduced funding for the 311 center. the document doesn't include tax increases. >>> there's a surprise for cavaliers fans. opening lineups are announced for the heat. lebron james doesn't appear. >> lebron james. [crowd booing] >> lebron james was in the bathroom. the calvs got the last laugh. the heat lost. 102-90. >>> the orioles finished up spring chaining and broke records doing so. more than 115,000 fans finished up at a renovated smith stadium. ed smith stadium hosted ten sellouts. a average attendance was 70,200,019. that's a lot. >>> and the oriole's home opener is this monday. our special pregame coverage starts at 2:00 and stick around for the game itself. a full day of oriol
the objective and u.s. involvement in the conflict. he did defend his decision to engage u.s. military forces in that conflict. in his weekly radio address today, he touted the successes of u.s. and coalition forces saying they have both helped to knock down moammar gadhafi's air defense mechanisms as well as push back his ground forces. the president said that he had to engage in this conflict to do to save lives. >> the united states should not and cannot intervene every time there's a crisis somewhere in the world. but i firmly believe that when innocent people are being brutalized, when someone like gadhafi threatens a blood bath that could destabilize an entire region, and when the international community is prepared to come together to save many thousands of lives, then it's in our national interest to act. >> reporter: but the president is facing mounting criticisms from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle who say there is a lack of congressional involvement in setting up u.s. policy in libya. and the president held a conference call with congressional leaders yesterday, trying to add
to take control of the sky over libya. possibly changing the role for u.s. troops in that region, and president obama is preparing his remarks on the situation there. >>> and running for cover in the middle east. protesters in syria met with a hail of gunfire. is that the next domino to fall? from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn "saturday morning." thank you for spending part of your weekend with us. we do want to start in japan right now where there is growing concerns over radiation levels in the ocean near that damaged nuclear plant, but there is some positive news as well from the fukushima plant. radiation levels in the air seem to be decreasing. cnn's paula hancocks live in tokyo. paula, hello. sounds like good news/bad news. let's start with the bad news. >> reporter: that's right, t.j. well, this is the water in the sea just off the coast of the fukushima nuclear plant. according to japan's nuclear safety agency, the levels of radioactive iodine are more than 1,200 levels than they should be. a cause for alarm. we're hearing from the agency it's only
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
? >> reporter: no. it's not what the u.s. was hoping he'd say. it's not what the syrian people were hoping he'd say, or the rest of the middle east that was looking toward the speech as really a significant benchmark to which direction syria would go. carol, this was a defiance speech. no major concessions and the message here was loud and clear. this is about survival of the regime of bashar al assad and clear, too, he wanted to stay and fight the emergency law that everyone fought. maybe he is actually going to lift it. did not happen. so that means the regime is able to use a very serious and dangerous tool where they can just detain people at their own whims and keep people in check that way. i spoke to one analyst who said if you're anyone in damascus today and you heard that speech you would probably think twice before getting out on the streets to demonstrate because the security services have a brutal history of cracking down really hard. the syrians know the reality on the ground. and it can be dire consequences. >> it sounds so much like what happened in egypt. it's eerie. how worri
of america has done what we said we would do. >> ok. so last night, he was talking about my leadership. u.s. led. go back 10 days ago, we didn't hear that. listen to this montage. >> in this effort, the united states is prepared to act as part of an international coalition. american leadership is essential. but that does not mean acting alone. in this effort, the united states is acting with a broad coalition. make no mistake, today we are part of a broad coalition. our goal is focused. our cause is just. and our coalition is strong. >> well, so that's the president as he evolved into this position and i think one of the many columnists who looked to the speech and analyzed the speech and said it best, this is a good speech if he said it 11 days ago, he would have quieted 95% of the critics. i would have found a way to give the secretary of state some credit. >> no kidding. she got him into this thing. >> it's amazing how much stuff you can do if you don't mind who gets the credit. that would have been a perfect time with hillary clinton leading -- secretary of state hillary clinton leadi
>>> good morning. a responsibility to act. president obama defends his decision to involvele the u.s. military in libya but vowed our troops will not be used to overthrow moammar gadhafi by force. >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. >> did the president say enough to quiet his critics? >> prince harry joins a punishing expedition to the north pole. we are with him live. >> and buried. a snow boarder crashes and becomes trapped upside down in six feet of snow. his helmet camera captured it all including a desperate call to his wife. >> i'm stuck in a tree well. give them my phone number. >> are you serious? >> i'm going to die if they don't find me. >> luckily, she did and he was finally rescued. he's sharing his story with us finally rescued. he's sharing his story with us today, tuesday, march 29, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> welcome to "today" on this tuesday morning. i'm meredith vieira. >> i'm matt lauer. president obama vowed america's role would be limited in libya last night. he told the nation we had fulfilled the pledge, we had done wha
congress first and defined the mission better n his weekly address, the president said the u.s. should not intervene every time there is a world crisis, but this is not a moment to stand idly by. >> when someone like gadhafi threatens a blood bath that can destabilize an entire region and when the international community is prepared to come together to save million thousands of lives, then it's in our national interest to act, and it's our responsibility. this is one of though times. >> the president will address the nation about libya monday night and cnn will bring it to you live with coverage starting at 7:00 p.m. eastern on monday night. >>> we have seen protests in the streets and nations seeking democracy, and today marching and shouting in a country where democracy already exists. why brits are up in arms over parliament's plans to cut spending. >>> and a police standoff with an interesting ending. why the suspected cop killer demanded local news stations carry his surrender live, and they have it. >>> you have a voice on this show. join us on our social media sites. check us ou
the effort to topple a dictatorship. with the u.s. currently involved in afghanistan, iraq, and providing large-scale humanitarian assistance in japan, it does not diminish." collins of maine said this. "i remain troubled that the president did not seek congressional consent in the absence of a national emergency. libya does not affect our country's vital interest." the president talked about who will lead and when. here is what he had to say. >> this transfer from the united states to nato will take place on wednesday. going forward, the lead in enforcing the no-fly zone and protecting civilians on the ground will transition to our allies and partners. i'm fully confident that our coalition will keep the pressure on gaddafi's remaining forces. in that effort, the united states will play a supporting role, including intelligence, logistical support, search and rescue assistance, and capabilities to jam regime communications. because of this transition to a broader nato-based coalition, the risk and cost of this operation to our military and to american taxpayers will be reduced significan
. violence rips law the middle east and the arab world. and now the u.s. is handed over control of the no-fly zone to nato but the u.s. military is still deeply involved. so what is going on? a live report moments away. and a muslim teacher asks for three weeks off to go on a pilgrimage and the school says "no way," she did not work there long enough and the department of justice is suing the school. what is up with that? >> states want to tax big corporations to fix their deficit instead of changing policy so now one big company, caterpillar, employs thousands of people, is ready to flee illinois. could this happen in your state? we continue right now with "fox and friends" this morning. >> welcome, everyone. you are watching "fox and friends" today. >> welcome to "fox and friends" on saturday morning. thank you for waking up with us. that is dave briggs and heather is here and i am clayton. >> lots going on today. >>dave: we start with new developments in libya where rebels have retaken the key town of ajdabiya after a fierce battle with muammar qaddafi forces and rick is live inside th
's forces driving the opposition fighters back from their earlier gains and now the u.s. and its allies still not ruling out the possibility of arming the rebels. where are we now? good morning, everybody, welcome here, i'm bill hemmer live in "america's newsroom". how you doing martha? martha: doing well, bill, good to see you, folks. there's a lot going on. i'm martha maccallum. as you can see, there's heavy fire in the town of ras lanuf, a town the rebels thought they had taken back, now they fight a wave of nato air strikes, forces loyal to qaddafi once again back on the advance and putting the rebels in a very tough situation, pinned down by huge rockets, qaddafi's mob said to be closing in once again. bill: rec leventhal, leading our coverage, he has moved to the east of ras lanuf and what that is happened in this battle, rick? >> reporter: good morning, bill and martha. we just lost power in adjabiya, this town fell to qaddafi troops, regained by the rebels and could be taken over once again by qaddafi's troops. they have been striking rebel positions west of us in the town of ra
in the program. moving on to libya, a country where our u.s. military is now involved in coalition air strikes helping to turn the tide in one city. rebels able to gain control of ajdabiya. the fight, a pierce one and bodies of more than a dozen men loyal to qaddafi scattered among the burned out artillery. troops were forced to retreat to the west. the rebels promise to march toward tripoli. steve, under the cover of the allied air strikes victory for the rebels. >>reporter: harris, this is a major turn around for the rebel force that is being formed and growing. they retreated for two weeks before this . now with the allied air strikes they were able to come out and launch an assault and take a town they had fled from. ajdabiya was a ghost town and it was the allied air strikes that were key. they targeted tanks and vehicles and supply lines . soldier running out of fuel and food were forced to retreat in the end. >> could we see this repeat in other cities? >> that's what the rebels are hoping for and asking for. a battle is shaping up in miraheta and once again ally airlines are pounding q
said in a potential intervention would come with regret. u.s. and allied forces meeting in paris to talk about potential military action. president obama said yesterday that the united states will take part in a no-flight effort. -- no-fly effort. we want to get your thoughts on the u.s. joined the no-fly effort. here is how you can contribute this morning. here iare the numbers at the bottom of your screen. the president announcing yesterday in a statement about the united states supporting a no-fly zone. this has been done by several allies. we will take a look at the headlines on "washington journal" this morning. mr. obama sketched out an american military role. -- rule. you have probably seen other headlines this morning as well. meetings are going on to talk about the strategy with the united states and other allied forces. the president made the statement yesterday about joining the no- fly zone effort. he spoke about what the united states will not do. here is what he had to say. >> i want to be clear about what we will not be doing. the united states is not going to depl
gadhafi's hometown. president obama prepares to explain his decision to involve the u.s. military in libya during an address to the nation tonight. >>> in a disturbing case, the 55 billionaire air to the s.c. johnson fortune charged with sexually abusing a child for years. the alleged victim, his now 15-year-old stepdaughter. >>> and princely party. harry threw his brother a bachelor party over the weekend but a hitch in the plans forced a last-minute change. we'll have details and tell you about our plans for the royal we'll have details and tell you about our plans for the royal wedding today, march 28, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. nice to be back. >> it's been a while. >> it has. i went to london to vicsit the queen. she wouldn't answer the door though. but president obama is going to face criticism. membe members of both parties have expressed concerns about the goal of the mission and how long our forces will be in libya. we'll have more straight ahead. >> also, did
all of this is. on the heels of a nuclear prices in japan, south carolina here in the u.s. went to court demanding that the nuclear regulatory commission provide a permanent place to store america's waste. there are 104 operating reactors, they're scattered across 65 plants in 31 different states. if you take a look at this map, this gives you a better idea of exactly where this 63 thousand tons of spent fuel, the darker the color of the state, the more radioactive waste that state has, according to the nrc. again, we're talking about 63,000 tons of spent fuel. if you take a look, with the telestrator working, illinois is the state with most, 776 tons. coming in second place is pennsylvania. as we know, pennsylvania, the site of three mile island, the nuclear site that had zadisaste back in the late '80s. and 3,700 tons of spent fuel. pretty much a tie with north carolina and south carolina here. let me show you a map quickly that illustrates what we're talking about when we say spent fuel. these are the spent fuel pools. they're steel-lined concrete pools filled with water like
.p.a. regs hanging over their head. the regulatory flexibility act. shaded areas indicate u.s. you is session. the 2009 research -- that's the word i can't read, organizations. look at how this is. this is what's happening from regulations. it's going up. on the unemployment scale. the r.e.f. requires the federal agencies to assess the economic impact on small business, we talked about that. to come up with alternatives because unemployment rates are around or above 9% for the past 22 months, it's time that we make these regulations be assessed and seven out of 10 of the new jobs are created by these small businesses. when you hear us talk about the pesticide act, it's very clear, there's the folks that are dealing with it right there. the farmers of america. and it's duplicative. that means they already have a permit that allows them to put out these pesticides and because of this ruling they're having to make -- get another permit at another cost and meet other guidelines for these pesticides. the sixth circuit, we think with this, made a bad ruling and these higher costs to producers and c
the country on u.s. action with libya with critics on both sides of the aisle hammering about the plan. what does he need to say? a former presidential speech write are is here next. >> dave: getting bang for their buck. radio shack, make ago unusual offer. buy satellite tv, get a gun. good idea? we report you decide. >> clayton: sometimes you want to shoot your tv. your cable. introducing the thunderbolt by htc. immense power. scorching speed. the first phone strong enough to run on the fastest, most advanced 4g network in america. the two trains and a bus rider. the "i'll sleep when it's done" academic. for 80 years, we've been inspireby you. and we've been honored to walk with you to help you get where u want to be. ♪ because your moment is now. let nothing stand in your way. ♪ [ giggles ] let nohey, max.nd in your way. [ announcer ] you can help significantly extend your dog's healthy years. a groundbreaking 14-year study by purina... proves that puppy chow, then dog chow nutrition, fed properly over a lifetime, can help extend his lovable antics up to 1.8 healthy years. long live yo
very much. a week into the campaign the u.s. role in libya is about to change. nato will take over enforcement of the no-fly zone but rebels and pro-gadhafi forces are fighting it out street to street. nbc's richard engel is one of the first journalists to reach ajdabiya where there are battles raging now. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. rebels have taken about half of this city. gadhafi's forces still contain pockets and have tanked positioned around the edges. we have seen street-to-street fighting. we can hear gunfire now. rebels have been taking cover, firing machine guns, trying to find gadhafi's forces and drive them out. this is what the war in libya has become. the western air strikes will take out gadhafi's heavy weapons, tanks, aircraft and allow the rebels to push into cities themselves and fight it out almost hand to hand with gadhafi's forces in several cities in libya. >> you talk hand to hand. i was struck on thursday by your reporting and how poorly equipped the rebels seemed to be in terms of weapons. are you sai seeing indications that they are being supp
even though libya is not vital to u.s. interests? that's the question. joining us now, dick morris, former advisor to president clinton and the author of the new book "revolt." all right. that's the question for you. >> well, i think that -- i wrote this in a column on my web site dickmorris.com. this guy is playing checkers when he should be playing chess. he's moving the pieces one at a time without thinking five moves down the road. so ok, we're intervening from the air to protect civilians from mass slaughter. all right, that's good right now. now, what happens if we can't get rid of qaddafi and he continues to slaughter the people? you're going to send in ground troops or just say, ok, now we'll turn a blind eye. let's say we get rid of qaddafi and then an iraq style civil war breaks out where his cronies and political party goes underground challenging the rebels with ongoing terrorist tactics like happened in iraq. are we going to turn a blind eye to that? at what point do you disengage. at what point do the libyan rebels take over and turn out to be heavily infiltrated by a
need the assistance of the u.s. and coalition forces in order to push back the advances of the libyan government troops, in particular when they were making the major advancement on benghazi, which officials here said would have cost the lives of tens of thousands of innocent civilians. will they need to be armed now in order to push gadhafi out? well, the president yesterday in one of those sit-down interviews again saying they're not ruling anything out or ruling anything in, but he said that question is being assessed. take a listen. >> one of the questions that we want to answer is, do we start getting to a stage where gadhafi's forces are sufficiently degraded where it may not be necessary to arm opposition groups, but we're not taking anything off the table at this point. >> reporter: now, aides here at the white house seem to feel that it there is progress being made there because of the pressure that's being applied in this phase two of the operation there, which is now being led by nato, brooke. >> because of the pressure being we know time is of the essence. so how long woul
president william millar. frank gaffney talks about the u.s. response to the civil war in libya. and a look at the problem of bullying in schools with francisco negron of the national school board association. >> video this morning courtesy of al-jazeera. this is the nuclear reactor in japan. according to the associated press, an explosion there destroyed a building housing the reactor. and also there are fears that it could melt down after being hit by the earthquake and tsunami there in japan. again, those reports saying that large amounts of radiation were coming out in the evacuation around the plant expanded. but officials didn't know how dangerous at this time the leak was to people. again that courtesy there from al-jazeera this morning of the plant. now, in related use, there are also reports this morning as far as those who are affected, 1,300 dead, 2,000 people in emergency shelters. as you see there, people waiting on top of buildings to be rescued by various means this morning. this courtesy of n.h.k. and also there and 50,000 emergency crews. we registered in findin
questions on capitol hill right now. some senators say the u.s. should rethink the wisdom of having nuclear plants in vulnerable or densely populated areas. >>> president obama says japan and libya show america's energy security is at the mercy of world events. he says americans demand alternatives when energy prices shoot up, but they also go into a trance and ignore the problem when prices fall. >> when i was elected to this office, america imported 11 million barrels of oil a day. by a little more than a decade from now, we will have cut that by one-third. >>> investigate fors in alabama are looking into the deaths of nine hospital patients. all received ivs contaminated by bacteria. ten other patients got the ivs and reportedly are not doing well. a company sold the iv bags at six hospitals and says the bags have now been recalled. >>> after weeks of violent protests in the streets. syria's president addressed his parliament today. mohammad, we have been watching here what is taking place, we have seen some brutal crackdowns by the security forces on the streets of syria, and reports to
life. for a woman in any country, in the u.s., egypt, libya, to come out and say she was raped. no one would do that unless they were raped especially in a conservative society. human rights watch have said girls and women who are survivors of rape are taken to because of the shame associated with rape. and these are centers where the girls and women are held as prisoners basically because -- >> they're not rehabilitated. >> social rehabilitation centers. >> held away from the rest of society. >> they're practically prisoners. >> that's the part that's most amazing. you've told you that sources say she's being held still even though they claim she's been set free. >> her mother and relatives have appeared on television and said that libyan officials have told them if she retracts the story, they'll release her. but gives me hope she's alive. but i won't believe she's alive until i see her. i was a journalist in libya, i went with a group of journalists in 1996, and they kept us in a hotel practically prisoners of gadha gadhafi's ministry of information. and during a news conference bec
ready to take off. and for the u.s., firing off cruise missiles, new video from the "uss stout." they have launched around 200 cruise missiles since this began eight days ago. the president briefly discussed this during his weekly white house message. >> the united states should not and cannot intervene every time there is a crisis somewhere in the world. but i firmly believe when innocent people are being brutalized when someone like gadhafi threaten as a bloodbath that can destabilize an entire region and the international community is prepared to come together to save thousands of lives, it's in our national interest to act. >> we are expecting to hear much more from president obama. and we talk to the american people about libya and the american involvement there. we will deliver an address from the national defense university in washington, d.c., scheduled for 7:30 eastern time. see that live right here on cnn. developments in japan as well. we need to turn there now. work has stopped at two of the damaged nuclear reactors at the fukushima plant. radiation level in standin
of the u.s. debate in part of the transfers to the transitional council? >> we haven't made a decision about arming the rebels or arms transfers, so there has not been any need to discuss that at this point. we did discuss nonlethal assistance and discussed ways of trying to enable the transition national council to meet a lot of their financial needs and how we could do that through the international community, given the challenges that sanctions pose, but recognizing they obviously are going to need funds to keep themselves going. we discussed a broad range of matters and certainly their presentation, which some of you may have seen earlier today as to what kind of civil society and political structure they are trying to build until libya, are exactly in line with what they have consistently said were their goals, their commitment to democracy and to a very robust engagement with people from across the spectrum of libyans is, i think, appropriate. we do not have any specific information about specific individuals from any organization who are part of this, but, of course, we are gett
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)